Home | About | Blog | Facebook | Twitter

Sunday, July 24, 2016

Farms struggle without workers

Farms struggle without workers: Early�Friday morning, farmer Bill Huston was already having a bad day -�the tractor had a flat tire, his truck wouldn't start and�people he was expecting to work in the fields picking vegetables hadn't arrived.

He needs seven pickers; on Friday�he was expecting four.

"Right now, I've got two," Huston said.

He also had an order for 60 boxes of zucchini, and if no one else is there to pick them, Huston would have to do it, which means other work won't get done and the business will fall further and further behind on things like paperwork, spraying and weeding.

What if the poor were sent to work on�town-owned farms? They were, and it wasn’t pretty

What if the poor were sent to work on�town-owned farms? They were, and it wasn’t pretty: Struggling to find a good way to care for their poor, towns throughout New Hampshire adopted a novel approach about 1830, when they began to buy up vacant farms where they hoped the able-bodied could live, work and provide for themselves.

The idea spread within a matter of five years to roughly 60 percent of the towns in the state, said Steve Taylor, the revered former commissioner of the state’s Department of Agriculture, in an hourlong talk in Chichester on Thursday.