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Sunday, January 24, 2016

Even in Off Season, New York Farms Still Busy With Work

Even in Off Season, New York Farms Still Busy With Work: They're growing in the spring, picking berries in the summer, and harvesting apples in the fall, but what about the winter?

"People always ask, 'what do farmers do during the winter?' I get asked all the time,” said Karin Reeves, a manager at Reeves Farm in Baldwinsville.

"A lot of people assume we're either on vacation or just not here. you have to remember that this is still a modern, working farm...so there's still plenty to do,” said Michael Blair, the production manager at Abbott Farms, also in Balswinsville.

Some farms have markets they keep open year round, while all have paperwork, new construction projects, and machines to maintain.

Fruit distributor Del Monte ‘eyeing more farms in Middle East’ - ArabianBusiness.com

Fruit distributor Del Monte ‘eyeing more farms in Middle East’ - ArabianBusiness.com: US food giant Del Monte Foods is planning to buy farms in Jordan and Saudi Arabia as part of an expansion across the Middle East.
The company, which produces and distributes food across the world and is known for its packaged fresh fruit, has farms in Turkey and the UAE and its regional headquarters is in Dubai.
However, it intends to expand its operations in the Middle East and is seeking to acquire new farms elsewhere in the region with a focus on Saudi Arabia and Jordan.

UK farmland prices head back to earth - FT.com

UK farmland prices head back to earth - FT.com: After a long and spectacular run, during which it has outperformed gold and Mayfair houses, the price of farmland is starting to head back to earth.
The cost of prime arable land fell last year for the first time in 13 years, according to Savills, the estate agent, because of falling commodity prices and growing uncertainty about what will happen to farming subsidies should Britain leave the EU.

Adding diversity to farms | Business | www.journalgazette.net

Adding diversity to farms | Business | www.journalgazette.net: A century ago, area farmers raised the pigs and chickens that put bacon and eggs on their families’ breakfast plates.�They also grew the wheat and churned the cream that became their buttered toast.

But agricultural operations typically have grown larger and more specialized, said Greg Slipher, Indiana Farm Bureau livestock development specialist.

Slipher is on a mission to remind farmers of the benefits of raising both crops and animals. To do so, he has teamed with�Ben Wicker, Indiana Pork’s director of producer outreach.

What is going to happen to your farmland after you are gone? | The Kansas City Star

What is going to happen to your farmland after you are gone? | The Kansas City Star: After 35 years of experience selling farmland, Rick Barnes of Barnes Realty noticed a common problem: When both parents are gone, the kids promptly start fighting about the family farm and everything else.

It is the last thing any parent would want to happen. Lawyers make a lot of money, and the family is broken forever.