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Thursday, January 07, 2016

What Input Costs Will Farmers Cut First in 2016? - Crops - News | Agweb.com

What Input Costs Will Farmers Cut First in 2016? - Crops - News | Agweb.com: “Bankers are going to be looking very closely at [debt to asset] ratios,” says Matt Bennett of Bennett Consulting. “We’re going to have to be better businessmen than we’ve been.”

Drought harder on farms in developed countries: study | CTV News

Drought harder on farms in developed countries: study | CTV News: New research suggests farms in developed countries may be more vulnerable to longer, deeper droughts predicted to occur as a result of climate change.
"(Those farms) are really good in terms of producing high yields in stable climates, but maybe they're more vulnerable to weather shocks," said Navin Ramankutty of the University of British Columbia, co-author of a paper published Wednesday in the journal Nature.
Ramankutty and his colleagues examined United Nations crop data from 177 countries between the years 1964 and 2007. Yields were correlated with about 2,800 extreme weather events over that time, including heat waves, droughts, cold snaps and floods.

Brazil Starts 2016 Soybean Harvest Next Week

Yields will be reduc... | SoyBeans | Agriculture: Once a renowned paradise in terms of rain for farmers in Brazil, the state of Mato Grosso has faced an atypical landscape with irregular rainfall levels in the heart of the soybean production areas combined with an excess of moisture in other top-producing southern states.
As a result, very significant crop losses could be occurring in Brazil and a strong turnaround for soybean prices. The answer for the first estimation may be yes, but on the second issue there is more certainty.
The Mato Grosso Institute of Agricultural Economics reduced its estimate for output in the state to nearly 30 million metric tons to less than 29 million metric tons of soybeans during the 2015/2016 crop season, confirming at least 1 million tons in losses. Considering the country as a whole, private consultancies forecast a crop ranging from 95 to 99 million metric tons, a strong fall given the fact that some previously foresaw a Brazilian output of over 100 million tons.

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack Announces 2015 Wildfires Burned Record Acres, Urges Congress to Pass Wildfire Funding Fix | USDA Newsroom

Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack Announces 2015 Wildfires Burned Record Acres, Urges Congress to Pass Wildfire Funding Fix | USDA Newsroom: Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced that in 2015, wildfires burned a record 10,125,149 acres across the United States, surpassing the previous record set in 2006. The Secretary renewed the call for Congress to pass the bi-partisan Wildfire Disaster Funding Act.

In 2015, there were more than 50 fires that exceeded 50,000 acres each; of those, 20 fires exceeded more than 100,000 acres each. In 2015, more than 4,500 homes and other structures were destroyed by wildfires and a total of 13 wildland firefighters, including 7 U.S. Forest Service firefighters, lost their lives in the line of duty.

Mexico: Frost damaged over 24,000 hectares of farmland Sonora

Mexico: Frost damaged over 24,000 hectares of farmland Sonora: About 24,000 hectares of crops established in the agricultural valleys of southern Sonora were partially or totally damaged by the frost caused by the fifth winter storm.

The head of the Ministry of Agriculture, Water Resources, Fisheries and Aquaculture (SAGARPA), Julio Corona Valenzuela, met with the affected farmers to check the damage that the frost caused on the crops.

So far there are 24,000 hectares affected by the frost, partially and totally, in the agricultural valleys of Yaqui and Mayo.

The crops grown in the area include squash, onions, peppers, green beans, beans, castor bean, corn, maize corn, potato, cucumber, tomato, tomatillo, and watermelon, among others.

The state official said that thanks to the information they had obtained a few days after the frosts they would start taking concrete actions to support producers to solve this emergency.

"The state government will work with federal authorities to declare an emergency zone so we can activate the corresponding protocols of the different units in favor of the affected producers," he said.

Indiana farmland value to decrease in 2016 | wlfi.com

Indiana farmland value to decrease in 2016 | wlfi.com: With higher interest rates set for 2016, coupled with record low crop yields during harvest season, Purdue Agriculture professor Craig Dobbins says farmland values are likely to decline five to 12 percent this year.

“Farmland, like any other land of real estate, means high interest rates are a negative influence,”�explained Dobbins. “If we do indeed see higher long-term interest rates, that’s going to be another negative item.”

China Pigs Addicted to Foreign Feed as Crop Imports Surge: Chart - Bloomberg Business

China Pigs Addicted to Foreign Feed as Crop Imports Surge: Chart - Bloomberg Business: China, the world’s largest pork-consuming country, has largely abandoned a goal of self-sufficiency when it comes to feeding the pigs, cattle and poultry needed to satisfy growing domestic demand for meat.

China slowdown, low oil prices and North Korea H-bomb weigh on Asian stock markets

China slowdown, low oil prices and North Korea H-bomb weigh on Asian stock markets: China's stocks were suspended from all trade on Thursday after the CSI300 tumbled more than 7 percent in early trade, triggering the market's circuit breaker for a second time this week.

That drop-kicked stock markets across Asia, which were already wallowing after a weaker open amid concerns over China's swooning currency and economic slowdown as well as falling oil prices.

Wake Up Call Allendale Advisory Center

Wake Up Call Allendale Advisory Center: Grain markets are lower as commodity traders turn sellers. Short covering in grains is being overshadowed by China’s stock market plummeting. Stock markets around the world are following China’s lead. Crude prices fall again as traders worry about oversupply. The US Dollar is lower.

China allows their currency to deflate causing a ripple effect across commodities. Investors are concerned the Chinese economy is weaker than even imaged.