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Sunday, January 03, 2016

Demand for agriculture graduates on the rise across the nation, USDA reports | Online Athens

Demand for agriculture graduates on the rise across the nation, USDA reports | Online Athens: Many parents and children today worry about both what college costs and whether after spending all that money they will be able to get a good job. In general, college graduates do get jobs after graduation — the unemployment rate for college grads is under 3 percent — but still families of current and approaching college students are concerned. One easy way to reduce the risk of post-graduate un- or underemployment is to gain skills in a field with a shortage of skilled workers. A great example of what students might study is food and agricultural systems.

Farming is a growing business in cities - Toledo Blade

Farming is a growing business in cities - Toledo Blade: �On Canyon Drive in dense, residential Clintonville, a sign in the window of a particular small house reads: “Organic farm, please do not spray.”

Step into Joseph Swain’s backyard and it is clear that this is no residential garden. A pair of long raised beds and a small hoop house take up much of the narrow lot. Chickens peck and scratch in a pen tucked into a corner. Bright green garlic shoots poke from the dark soil that hasn’t been covered with straw for the winter.

This is urban agriculture — small plots, novice farmers, and a belief that people want locally grown food.

Minnesota Gov. Dayton wants $100 million for rural web access | Duluth News Tribune

Minnesota Gov. Dayton wants $100 million for rural web access | Duluth News Tribune: The costly Internet at home is too slow and unreliable to share the large files he needs as an insurance underwriter. Even when it is at full strength, the speed isn’t great, he said.

“I would never call it fast. It is tolerable,” said Reisch, a Rock County commissioner.

Farmers paid to go back to nature | NWADG

Farmers paid to go back to nature | NWADG: Not far away, a black bear invaded and trashed an empty deer stand. A huge buck makes regular appearances on game cameras. Native grasses are thriving in otherwise empty fields, habitat in the making for the quail that Whicker and his fellow landowners hope to attract to the area.

"It's what it should be now," he said of the 6,000-acre stretch of Arkansas River Valley wetlands, parts of which were once farmland.