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Thursday, December 24, 2015

Wait, Who's Selling This Tennessee Farmhouse? A Horse, of Course! - Modern Farmer

Wait, Who's Selling This Tennessee Farmhouse? A Horse, of Course! - Modern Farmer: Page got the idea of using Willie to help sell the house after reading about the “Email a Tree” campaign in Melbourne, Australia, which started as way for people to report things like broken limbs around the city. Eventually, it turned into a virtual arboreal love fest, with various trees around the city receiving fan mail from as far away as the United States. Page�realized Willie could also accept emails and, frankly, do a better job than a tree when it came to repping the family’s land.�

The current owners, Page’s parents, have owned the farm for 15 years and want to move closer to their children in the Nashville area. (He says his parents are “old school” and don’t want their names mentioned in the story.) The plot�boasts a variety of�nut trees, muscadine grapes, a vegetable garden that includes okra, carrots, and jerusalem artichoke, plus pear and apple�trees. Other livestock include�goats, chickens, and turkeys.

U.S. faces an aging farm population | Pork Network

U.S. faces an aging farm population | Pork Network: An aging American farm population, the need to successfully transition land ownership from senior farmers to new industry entrants, and providing support and training for these beginning farmers, are top concerns for the future of the American farming industry, said an agricultural economist in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University.

Eye on Agriculture: Losses Expected in 2016 - KXNet.com - Bismarck/Minot/Williston/Dickinson-KXNEWS,ND

Eye on Agriculture: Losses Expected in 2016 - KXNet.com - Bismarck/Minot/Williston/Dickinson-KXNEWS,ND: The NDSU Extension Service is projecting losses for nearly all North Dakota crops in 2016.

Tim Olson has more in this week's Eye on Agriculture.

(Paige Brummund, NDSU Extension Agent) "Who would sign up for something where one year you may earn, say, $60,000 this year, but the next two years, you're only gonna get $15,000. You know, who signs up for that?"

But that's the scenario that farmers in North Dakota could be facing in 2016.

Lower crop prices have led the NDSU Extension Service to project negative returns for farmers in the coming year -- even for crops that are usually dependable.

Gerawan Farms exits table grape business, affecting 2,500 workers | Fresno Bee

Gerawan Farms exits table grape business, affecting 2,500 workers | Fresno Bee: Gerawan Farming, one of the largest growers of tree fruit and grapes in Fresno County, has alerted its employees and government officials that it is shutting down its table grape operations next year, affecting more than 2,500 workers.

The Reedley-based farming company issued a layoff notice, required under both state and federal employment law, on Dec. 18, declaring that the shutdown will take effect on Feb. 25.

Ronald Barsamian, a Fresno attorney for the company, said the vineyards are scattered between Fresno and Kerman. He declined to address how many acres of vines are involved in the decision, but added that the vineyards will be torn out. “They’re still going to have a little bit of vineyard, but those will go to the winery, not for table grapes,” Barsamian said Wednesday.

Property Tax Structure Puts Pressure On Farmers | News - Indiana Public Media

Property Tax Structure Puts Pressure On Farmers | News - Indiana Public Media: Kevin Underwood is a second-generation West Lafayette farmer. He can’t afford to replace his tractors for two reasons. There has been too much rain, and he’s under a property tax structure that charges him based on what he pulled out of the ground three years ago.

Underwood says,�“Because of that, we’re having to hold off on a lot of those purchases that we really hoped we’d be able to start back up on again, and so we’re making those kind of decisions to try to just keep from adding additional loan expenses as we move forward.”

Underwood says his taxes alone are around $50,000 to $55,000, and they’re projected to grow at least 15% next year. Underwood’s land is worth $1.5 million. He says even if he tried to sell his land, he’d get a depressed rate because other farmers aren’t expanding and demand is low. Plus, he’d be out of a job.

Wall Street wobbly in thin volumes ahead of holidays

Wall Street wobbly in thin volumes ahead of holidays: U.S. stock index futures pointed to a flat open on Thursday amid light trade as investors prepare for a shortened trading day for the Christmas holiday.

Stocks close at 1 p.m. ET on Thursday and are closed for the Christmas holiday on Friday. Other markets including energy and bonds will also close early, shutting at 1:30 p.m. ET and 2 p.m., ET, respectively.

Super El Nino causing weather anomalies worldwide | Farm Press Blog

Super El Nino causing weather anomalies worldwide | Farm Press Blog: Weather scientists now say this year’s “extreme” El Ni�o weather phenomenon is the strongest ever recorded, which could mean more abnormal winter weather for all of North America.

The West, which has suffered major drought in recent years, could see significant flooding, much of the Southwest could be colder than normal with bigger snowfalls, while large areas of the Mid-South and northeast have been experiencing warmer than normal weather. Skiers in the eastern states are already complaining of the “snow drought,” thanks to warm temperatures now forecast into January, while moisture-laden storms are dumping snow on ski areas in the western states.

Sesame is drought tolerant and not palatable to deer and wild hogs | Grains content from Southwest Farm Press

Sesame is drought tolerant and not palatable to deer and wild hogs | Grains content from Southwest Farm Press: It’s hog-proof, deer-proof, cattle don’t like it, horses won’t eat it — and it doesn’t appeal to sheep either. Disease pressure is infrequent and yield potential is good with as little as 12 inches of water.

Sesame may not be a magic crop that solves all the production challenges for Southwest farmers, but it may offer a viable alternative or profitable rotation crop for more traditional enterprises.

5 Grain Market Lessons Learned in 2015 | Agweb.com

5 Grain Market Lessons Learned in 2015 | Agweb.com: As any farmer knows, it's been a tough year in the grain markets. How many times do you want to see that corn prices are below the cost of production? But with 2015 nearly in the books, perhaps we can all learn from the past so we can build a better, more effective�marketing plan for 2016, based on the 5 �grain market�lessons learned�in�'15.

Wake Up Call Allendale Advisory Center

Wake Up Call Allendale Advisory Center: All of us at Allendale want wish you a Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays! Enjoy the long weekend with family and friends.

Grain markets are quiet as the holiday begins around the world. The US Dollar retraces some of its weekly gains while crude oil is steady. The Lean hog futures could have some fireworks today as USDA put “all hogs” at record levels for Dec 1 but data shows producers have been aggressive marketers recently.