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Thursday, December 17, 2015

Corn Prices Are below Key Moving Averages - Market Realist

Corn Prices Are below Key Moving Averages - Market Realist: March corn futures prices were trading below the key support level of 370 cents per bushel on December 16, 2015. Corn prices lost the key support level of their 20-day moving average of 373 cents per bushel with a�2% fall on December 16, 2015.

El Nino Cools Africa’s Economic Engine

El Nino Cools Africa’s Economic Engine - WSJ: Protectionism and smuggling routes are blooming instead of corn and cassava across Africa, as a record drought pushes countries to hoard grain and drives more than 30 million people toward hunger.

The ocean-warming phenomenon known as El Ni�o is extending Africa’s worst dry spell in three decades, raising the specter of a second poor harvest in many countries.

Informa lowers forecasts for U.S. 2016 soy and corn plantings | Agweek

Informa lowers forecasts for U.S. 2016 soy and corn plantings | Agweek: Private analytics firm Informa Economics lowered its projections of U.S. 2016 corn and soybean plantings, trade sources said on Thursday.
Informa, based in Memphis, Tennessee, lowered its forecast of 2016 U.S. corn plantings to 88.926 million acres, from 90.1 million last month.

Most Asian Stocks Fall As Investors Shift Focus From Fed To Oil, Global Growth

Most Asian Stocks Fall As Investors Shift Focus From Fed To Oil, Global Growth: Asian shares fell early Friday, following the U.S., as investors shifted their�focused back on falling oil prices and slowing global growth after cheering the Federal Reserve's historic move on Wednesday. Taiwan unexpectedly cut interest rates citing the weakening world economy.

Japan's Nikkei 225 fell 0.1 percent, with the Bank of Japan expected to maintain its economic stimulus program at its Thursday meeting. South Korea's KOSPI fell 1 percent and�Australia's ASX 200 0.7 percent.�Singapore's STI was up 0.7.

Omor rice farm to engage 5,000 workers

Omor rice farm to engage 5,000 workers: he abandoned Omor Rice Mill, with 5,000 hectres of farm, which has now been fully rehabilitated, is expected to deliver not less than 5,000 jobs when fully functional, according to the Anambra State Government.

Special Assistant to Governor Willie Obiano on Investment, Prince Ifeanyi Anugwu, made this known in a retreat session organised by the All Progressives Grand Alliance (APGA) in Awka.

Program to boost yields of less-fertile farmland

Program to boost yields of less-fertile farmland: A yearlong program to increase yields of wheat, corn and soybeans in China's less-fertile regions will rely on science and technology to invigorate agricultural production and benefit 70 million farmers, according to an official from the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

The program, dubbed Second Granary, is expected to reap an additional 9 billion kilograms of grain by increasing the output of medium- and low-yielding farmland, said Duan Ziyuan, deputy director of the academy's Bureau of Science & Technology for Development, at a seminar in Hefei, Anhui province, on Tuesday.

Congress may give conservation fund extended life | The Seattle Times

Congress may give conservation fund extended life | The Seattle Times: A budget bill headed for congressional approval Friday revives the popular Land and Water Conservation Fund for three years.

The bill also budgets $450 million in royalties from oil and gas leases on public lands for the fund for the coming fiscal year.

Why the Fed move doesn't matter to mortgage rates

Why the Fed move doesn't matter to mortgage rates: The Federal Reserve did it — raised the target federal funds rate a quarter point, its first boost in nearly a decade. That does not, however, mean that the average rate on the 30-year fixed mortgage will be a quarter point higher when we all wake up on Thursday. That's not how mortgage rates work.

Mortgage rates follow the yields on mortgage-backed securities. These bonds track the yield on the U.S. 10-year Treasury. The bond market is still sorting itself out right now, and yields could end up higher or lower by the end of the week.

A LOOT AT 2016 — Outlook for agriculture sector is daunting, but outlook for technology promising - Mississippi Business Journal

A LOOT AT 2016 — Outlook for agriculture sector is daunting, but outlook for technology promising - Mississippi Business Journal: In the year ahead, agriculture-heavy Mississippi faces headwinds from declines in commodity prices that have caused a lot of concern in farm circles. State Economist Dr. Darrin Webb said 2015 was not a particularly good year for ag in Mississippi and elsewhere. The USDA expects U.S. net farm income to be the lowest since 2002 and less than half of what it was two years ago.
“While nationally production of some crops reached record or near-record levels, such as corn and soybeans, these large crops depressed prices compared to recent years,” Webb said.
“Moreover, weather in the state such as the drought conditions in late summer and rain at less than ideal times reduced the size of some producers’ crops, limiting their ability to offset lower prices. At the same time, production costs to date haven’t fallen as much relative to commodity prices. As land rental rates have changed little, a number of Mississippi producers will likely experience cash flow issues. The outlook for prices in 2016 not expected to rise much.”

A LOOT AT 2016 — Outlook for agriculture sector is daunting, but outlook for technology promising - Mississippi Business Journal

A LOOT AT 2016 — Outlook for agriculture sector is daunting, but outlook for technology promising - Mississippi Business Journal: In the year ahead, agriculture-heavy Mississippi faces headwinds from declines in commodity prices that have caused a lot of concern in farm circles. State Economist Dr. Darrin Webb said 2015 was not a particularly good year for ag in Mississippi and elsewhere. The USDA expects U.S. net farm income to be the lowest since 2002 and less than half of what it was two years ago.
“While nationally production of some crops reached record or near-record levels, such as corn and soybeans, these large crops depressed prices compared to recent years,” Webb said.
“Moreover, weather in the state such as the drought conditions in late summer and rain at less than ideal times reduced the size of some producers’ crops, limiting their ability to offset lower prices. At the same time, production costs to date haven’t fallen as much relative to commodity prices. As land rental rates have changed little, a number of Mississippi producers will likely experience cash flow issues. The outlook for prices in 2016 not expected to rise much.”

India hardens stance in WTO; objects to agriculture draft - The Economic Times

India hardens stance in WTO; objects to agriculture draft - The Economic Times: Hardening its stance in the ongoing WTO talks, India today strongly objected to the draft text on agriculture and said some countries are pushing for a deal on phasing out export subsidies with "some undue haste".

Television series returns to feature three more local farms | thebaynet.com | TheBayNet.com | Articles

Television series returns to feature three more local farms | thebaynet.com | TheBayNet.com | Articles: hree Southern Maryland farms will be featured in episodes of the new season of the Maryland Public Television (MPT) series "Maryland Farm & Harvest" airing in January and February.

Featured on the program on Tuesday, January 12 at 7 p.m. is Cohoke Farms in Charles County. Hungry birds are a threat to the farm’s milo crop, which is ironic since this grain is being raised for birdseed.� Host Joanne Clendining follows the farmers as they take the harvest from field to factory.

Also featured on the Tuesday, January 12 episode is Even’Star Organic Farm in St. Mary’s County. During The Local Buy segment, Al Spoler learns that it’s possible to grow greens outside in the winter. In fact, Al finds out from this Lexington Park farmer that the cold weather can actually make them sweeter.

Nigeria: How Boko Haram Is Killing Off Farms - allAfrica.com

Nigeria: How Boko Haram Is Killing Off Farms - allAfrica.com: Bulama Buba Kadai once owned 20 farms and more than 100 head of cattle near Gwoza in northeastern Nigeria. A year ago, when Boko Haram attacked his village, Kadai's land and all but two cows were destroyed. He also lost his two sons - the sole heirs of any property he may one day leave behind. "I think most of us are going back to our graves," Kadai told IRIN.

Ongoing attacks have destroyed land and killed thousands of young men since 2009, and, in some cases, wiped out or displaced entire generations of farmers and herders. The future of many rural communities in northeastern Nigeria is, at best, uncertain, at worst, unsustainable.

Kadai, and some 500 other farmers from his former community have taken refuge in Malkohi, on the outskirts of Yola, the capital city and administrative capital of Adamawa State. Some of them were temporarily allotted a small piece of land by the local government earlier this year, but yields were poor.

Haitians are noticing climate change impacts on extreme weather and agriculture | John Abraham | Environment | The Guardian

Haitians are noticing climate change impacts on extreme weather and agriculture | John Abraham | Environment | The Guardian: A former student of mine, Luke Hacker formed an organization called Simply Love, which works in Haiti to support educational and agricultural growth in the country. Through this group, I was introduced to an agricultural expert who relayed this personal story about environmental impacts on the island.

The story below is from Zacharie Bien-Aime, Agronomist, Local Technique Agent for the United Nations.

Addressing climate change in agriculture | Grand Forks Herald

Addressing climate change in agriculture | Grand Forks Herald: As the climate changes, so will agriculture.


How exactly?

That's what several experts examined Tuesday during a Climate and Agriculture Workshop at the Davison County Fairgrounds in Mitchell. South Dakota State University Extension hosted the workshop, which included presentations from five of SDSU's research and Extension experts on how climate will affect things such as plants, plant disease, pests and crop production.

Electronic agriculture market will cover 250 mandis by next September - The Economic Times

Electronic agriculture market will cover 250 mandis by next September - The Economic Times: The electronic national agriculture market will cover 250 mandis (wholesale markets) by next September, ensuring free movement of farm produce from one market area to another, Agriculture Minister Radha Mohan Singh said. This would give producers access across markets, save them from levies charged by multiple mandis and ensure commodities to consumers at reasonable prices.

Local farmers filing to be intervenors on pipeline | The Recorder

Local farmers filing to be intervenors on pipeline | The Recorder: The Hawks Farm, with its seventh generation now working the land to produce beef and pork as well as other products, is among the historic and environmentally sensitive properties to be crossed by Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co.’s proposed Northeast Energy Direct project. Its owners are among three farmers who are filing to intervene in a case now before federal regulators.

“Historically, this area was known as ‘Wisdom’ and ‘The Old World,’ and has been described as God’s Country,” says the Dec. 10 filing by John Herron, JoAnn Herron, Christopher Totman, Susannah Herron, Emmalee Herron and John Herron Jr. to protect the farm, first cleared in 1783. “Places like these are extremely rare and deserve to be preserved for their intrinsic value, history, beauty and productivity. This land grows food. It sustains a healthy ecosystem. It brings peace to those who live here and who pass through. The deep family roots, hard work and legacy deserve to be protected. The waterfalls, pastures, fields, forests, brooks, freshwater springs, historic homes and barns deserve to be protected.”

Rural Bankers Turn Even More Negative on Farmland Values | Agweb.com

Rural Bankers Turn Even More Negative on Farmland Values | Agweb.com: Rural bankers have turned even more negative on farmland prices, according to this month's Rural Mainstreet Index, conducted by Creighton University's Dr. Ernie Goss. The survey, which measure rural bank CEO attitudes across ten Midwestern states, found the farmland and ranchland price index for December sank to 28.8 from November's weak 34.8. The index considers a rating of 50 to be growth neutral.

Bankers say economy to stay weak in rural parts of 10 states

Bankers say economy to stay weak in rural parts of 10 states: Bankers expect economic activity to remain slow in rural parts of 10 Western and Plains states over the next few months.

The region's economic index declined again in December to 41.5 from November's 43.7. Any score below 50 on one of the survey's indexes suggests that factor will decline.

Grim picture for 2016 crop prices | Ohio Ag Net | Ohio's Country Journal

Grim picture for 2016 crop prices | Ohio Ag Net | Ohio's Country Journal: Barry Ward recalls the not-so-distant past when he could relay positive stories and bright agricultural outlooks in the weeks and months ahead. Those talks were just a memory for the speaker at today’s Grain Farmers Symposium.

“This was a lot nicer talk to give a few years ago. That was a period unlike anything we had even seen in our lifetimes,” said Ward, leader of OSU Extension’s Production Business Management program. “There is not much good news in terms of profitability in crop agriculture today. There are a few small positives but not many.”

China's Agricultural Imports To Challenge Market In 2016 - TheStreet

China's Agricultural Imports To Challenge Market In 2016 - TheStreet: China's slowing economic growth has been well documented in the last year due to concerns that it could derail several industries globally. However, China's economic slowdown is not the primary cause for what is expected to be a significant decline in its agricultural imports in 2015 and 2016, according to a new report produced by CoBank's Knowledge Exchange Division. Instead, the decline can be attributed to multi-year highs of supplies in several different commodities - corn, wheat, cotton, milk powder and soybeans.

No aid for slumping commodities as Fed rate move bolsters dollar

Farm Dispatch: No aid for slumping commodities as Fed rate move bolsters dollar:

Rathbone's James Thomson: 'I won't invest in commodities, banks or utilities' | Daily Mail Online

Rathbone's James Thomson: 'I won't invest in commodities, banks or utilities' | Daily Mail Online: Rathbone fund manager James Thomson is refusing to invest in commodities, banks or utilities - because he argues that these companies fall victim to fluctuations in the wider economy.

The �627.3million Rathbone Global Opportunities�fund operates with an unconstrained, high-conviction style so the manager can completely avoid areas where he doesn't see a strong investment case.

The fund has nothing invested in banking, commodities or utilities, while its biggest weighting is to the consumer services industry via companies such as Betfair.

Farm Dispatch - Major Nebraska/Kansas farmland auction to include irrigated cropland, dryland, pasture

Farm Dispatch - Major Nebraska/Kansas farmland auction to include irrigated cropland, dryland, pasture

Real estate in Silicon Valley: Shopping for deals - Bay Area Homes

Real estate in Silicon Valley: Shopping for deals - Bay Area Homes: Setting the GPS in his car, real estate agent Craig Gorman announces his outlandish intention: “What I am about to show you,” he says, “is that there are still affordable areas where you can still find a deal in Santa Clara County.”

True, he defines a “deal” as $650,000 or less for a three-bedroom, two-bath single-family home. That may not match everyone’s bargain price. But in the current market, it’s arguably a steal.

And by slicing and dicing the MLS listings, Gorman has culled 48 such properties in the county, where the median price for a home is close to $1 million and twice that in hot spots like Menlo Park and Palo Alto. These days, the search for affordability resembles the search for an endangered animal species; one must find those shrinking pockets of the county’s 1,300 square miles where the rare breed still exists.

Gorman, the outgoing president of the Santa Clara County Association of Realtors, ticks off some of the pockets, mostly in San Jose: the North Valley-Berryessa district in the north, the Alum Rock and Santa Teresa areas in the south, as well as downtown in the middle. There’s also Gilroy and Morgan Hill in South County, where properties tend to be somewhat newer and cleaner, he says.

Google and Apple seal North San Jose property deals, in tech expansion - Bay Area Homes

Google and Apple seal North San Jose property deals, in tech expansion - Bay Area Homes: Google and Apple said Tuesday that they have completed fresh realty deals in San Jose, transactions that broaden the footprint of digital titans in North San Jose.

The North San Jose deals underscore the emergence of that part of Silicon Valley as a major hub for tech company expansions or beachheads.

What’s more, the push for office and research facilities in the city by Apple, Google, Samsung, Broadcom and other organizations, including real estate developers, will transform not only North San Jose but also downtown and sections on the west side of town such as the area around Santana Row.

6 Real Estate Secrets You Can Learn From House Flippers

6 Real Estate Secrets You Can Learn From House Flippers: You’ve seen the TV shows: Individual finds a foreclosed home in the best neighborhood in town, scoops up said home for a steal, fixes it up, and sells it for a significant profit. What those DIY and home improvement shows don’t necessarily show you, though, is how tough flipping houses for a profit can actually be, whether it’s Miami, FL real estate or a home in Bismarck, ND.

But professional house flippers have insights that can be helpful to just about anyone who’s looking to buy or sell real estate. Here are the six secrets house flippers know that you can apply to your own real estate adventures.

6 Tips For Securing Farmland

6 Tips For Securing ... | Land | Agriculture: Each year, you are constantly barraged by companies pitching seed, chemical, fertilizer, and other agricultural inputs.
All are worthy spending decisions worth your consideration. Yet, they’re all for naught without one crucial input: land.
Of all the spending decisions you make each year, land is likely your most complicated one. Should you rent more? Rent less? Cash-rent or share-rent? If you rent, how do you gain a potential landlord’s attention or hold rented ground once you have it?
It’s not simple on the land-buying side, either. Sure, you nix the landlord portion of the land acquisition equation. Yet, you likely tie up capital that could be used elsewhere.
Following are six tips designed to help you weave your way through these tough decisions.

Andy Warhol’s Hamptons Estate Sells for a Record $50 Million - WSJ

Andy Warhol’s Hamptons Estate Sells for a Record $50 Million - WSJ: The former Andy Warhol estate in Montauk—a collection of white-shingled cottages overlooking the ocean—has sold for $50 million, believed to be a record for the former fishing village.

The buyer of the roughly 5.7-acre oceanfront compound, called “Eothen,” was Adam Lindemann, founder of the gallery Venus Over Manhattan. The property had been listed together with a 24-acre horse farm for $85 million, but Mr. Lindemann wasn't interested in the horse farm, and it is still available, said Paul Brennan of Douglas Elliman Real Estate, who listed the property with Sotheby’s International Realty. The seller was J.Crew CEO Millard “Mickey” Drexler, who bought the property for $27.5 million in 2007, according to public records.

US Raises Rates, Argentina Allows Peso To Float

Wake Up Call Allendale Advisory Center

Farmers React to the Final Spending Bill | Agweb.com

Farmers React to the Final Spending Bill | Agweb.com: Not every issue important to farmers got a seat on the bus yesterday. The continents of the omnibus spending bill completed last night supports a repeal of country-of-origin labeling (COOL), modifies the dietary guidelines, and allocates a significant amount of money to agriculture research and food safety. Great news, except the broad sweeping $1.1 trillion spending package lacks the riders that would prevent state GMO-labeling laws and block the EPA’s Waters of the U.S. Rule.