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Sunday, December 06, 2015

As China Pledges $60 Billion In African Development Aid, Critics Are Skeptical

As China Pledges $60 Billion In African Development Aid, Critics Are Skeptical: At the latest meeting of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC), Chinese President Xi Jinping pledged $60 billion in developmental aid for African nations. The money will help fund infrastructure, agriculture and training, according to Forbes.

Three Questions for Robert Redford

Three Questions for Robert Redford: Robert Redford, the actor, director and co-founder of the Sundance Film Festival, is a longtime environmental activist. On Sunday, he joined three people from indigenous communities�in Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and the Marshall Islands�for a discussion at the Unesco headquarters here.

Panthers vs. Saints: What's the Game Plan for New Orleans? | Bleacher Report

Panthers vs. Saints: What's the Game Plan for New Orleans? | Bleacher Report: The home-standing New Orleans Saints will attempt to score their fifth win of the season Sunday afternoon, but they’ll have their hands full against the undefeated Carolina Panthers.

New Orleans (4-7) is looking to snap a three-game losing streak, and playing in the familiar confines of the Mercedes-Benz Superdome should provide an edge, however slight, to coach Sean Payton’s struggling club.

At b2b startup Button, a very particular Japanese philosophy informs the culture | Crain's New York Business

At b2b startup Button, a very particular Japanese philosophy informs the culture | Crain's New York Business: Button is a company that strives to embody the Japanese value of�omotenashi—wholehearted hospitality. This ethos informs not only the firm's business model, but also its thoughtfulness in regard to the needs and wants of its employees, within and beyond the workplace. “When you join Button, you join a family,” said Stephen Milbank, a co-founder and head of finance and people at the company, which scored the top spot on this year's Crain's 100 Best Places to Work in New York City. "We aim to support each other in every aspect of our lives."

Keeping up with the Vanderbilts | Crain's New York Business

Keeping up with the Vanderbilts | Crain's New York Business: The implication in “Vanderbilt family refinances Madison Avenue office tower for $80 million” (CrainsNewYork.com) that there is still some vast, hidden and unitary Vanderbilt fortune is simply erroneous, although individual branches of the family, by dint of their subsequent efforts, may have built their own fortunes.

The original Cornelius Vanderbilt, who started the Vanderbilt fortune, died in 1877. His son and main heir, William H., died around 1885. By the time the building cited in the article was constructed, there was a Cornelius Vanderbilt III and a Cornelius Vanderbilt IV, who were part of a sprawling family several generations along a course of financial division and healthy spending.

After subprime collapse, nonbank lenders again dominate riskier mortgages - Bay Area Homes

After subprime collapse, nonbank lenders again dominate riskier mortgages - Bay Area Homes: PennyMac, AmeriHome Mortgage and Stearns Lending have several things in common.

All are among the nation’s largest mortgage lenders — and none of them is a bank. They’re part of a growing class of alternative lenders that now extend more than 4 in 10 home loans.

All are headquartered in Southern California, the epicenter of the last decade’s subprime lending industry. And all are run by former executives of Countrywide Financial, the once-giant mortgage lender that made tens of billions of dollars in risky loans that contributed to the 2008 financial crisis.