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Thursday, November 12, 2015

New York City rent is too high for singles and seniors, Citizens Budget Commission report says | Crain's New York Business

New York City rent is too high for singles and seniors, Citizens Budget Commission report says | Crain's New York Business: Nearly half of the city's households are paying too much in rent, and the pressure is particularly acute for low-income singles, seniors and single parents, according to a study released Thursday.

The Citizens Budget Commission studied newly available data from the U.S. Census Bureau that calculated how much New Yorkers pay out-of-pocket for rent—in other words the numbers were adjusted if a renter received a subsidy to help pick up his or her monthly tab aside from household income.

The real reason foreclosures spiked in October

The real reason foreclosures spiked in October: It is possibly the nastiest consequence of the holiday season. Foreclosures rise now, as banks try to get ahead of the traditional December moratoriums, when they suspend all foreclosures due to the holidays.

No lender wants to take a house back during the holidays, but it appears to be particularly bad now for a number of reasons.

Immigrant workers help save Wisconsin dairy farms | Marketplace.org

Immigrant workers help save Wisconsin dairy farms | Marketplace.org: Wisconsin is known for its cheese. The cheese-shaped hats that Green Bay Packer fans wear are a quirky reminder of the state's $50 billion dairy industry. Yet a tough market means that many farmers are having to choose between going out of business or expanding to achieve greater economy of scale.

The Nelson farm is a family operation with 450 cows. Don Nelson has lived in this community his entire life, and raised his children here on the farm. Still working at 85, he told me that at $16 a hundredweight, the price of milk is lower than their costs.�

Missouri agriculture grant to help area Hmong farmers

Fue Yang walks by rows of yu choy, an Asian green with bright yellow flowers, and rows of freshly planted garlic on the farm he runs with his parents.
Yang said his family farms much as his parents — Neng and Zoua Yang — did in Laos, planting and harvesting the vegetables by hand. But Yang is part of an effort to try to extend the growing season for Hmong farmers in Southwest Missouri and Northwest Arkansas. 

Eric Noll, chief executive of Convergex, highlights how the SEC is tackling the problem of ultrafast, computer-driven trading that institutional investors are only just waking up to | Crain's New York Business

Eric Noll, chief executive of Convergex, highlights how the SEC is tackling the problem of ultrafast, computer-driven trading that institutional investors are only just waking up to | Crain's New York Business: Eric Noll is chief executive of Convergex, a Wall Street brokerage and research firm that serves institutional investors. A clarinetist, Noll is trying to bring some harmony back to equity, bond and commodity markets, which these days are ultrafast, fragmented and computer-driven. Noll has long spoken about those points, and last year they were highlighted in Michael Lewis’ best-selling book Flash Boys.

Rabbit Ridge Gin plots a course ahead | Cotton content from Delta Farm Press

Rabbit Ridge Gin plots a course ahead | Cotton content from Delta Farm Press: As tufts of cottonseed debris swirl in the late October air, Tri Watkins walks across the Rabbit Ridge Gin yard warmly greeting employees. This is northeast Arkansas -- Lepanto is a few miles west of here and Dyess, where Johnny Cash was raised, is a few miles south – and the gin is one of a shrinking number.

Observations On Winter Wheat From A Long Fall | Farms.com

Observations On Winter Wheat From A Long Fall | Farms.com: This morning was the first day this fall that I scraped car windows. We are, for the most part, enjoying an unusually long fall with a few sporadic shots of welcome precipitation. The winter wheat looks good. Good growing conditions have given it time to produce tillers with the rains helping.

Some fields of winter wheat appear to have some volunteer spring wheat growing in them. This could be the result of winter wheat seeded into spring wheat stubble or it could be the result of some spring wheat contamination in fertilizer or the winter wheat seed itself. Much of this spring wheat is noticeable this year because it is already elongating and producing joints. The spring wheat will die with 20 degree or lower air temperatures and should not cause any major problems unless the proportion of spring wheat is very high.

Soybean Yield Under Conventional And Organic Cropping Systems With Recommended And High Inputs During The Transition Year To Organic | Farms.com

Soybean Yield Under Conventional And Organic Cropping Systems With Recommended And High Inputs During The Transition Year To Organic | Farms.com: We initiated a 3-year study at the Aurora Research Farm in 2015 to compare the corn, soybean, and wheat/red clover rotation under conventional and organic cropping systems during the 3-year transition period (2015-2017) to an organic cropping system. We used three entry points or previous crops from 2014 to initiate the 2015-2017 study: 1) grain corn, 2) small grain, and 3) soybean. Three of the many objectives of the study are 1) to determine the best previous crop (2014) for the transition, 2) the best crop to plant in the first year (2015) during the transition and 3) do corn, soybean, and wheat respond similarly to management inputs (high and recommended) under conventional and organic cropping systems? This article will discuss soybean yield and seed weight under conventional and organic cropping systems under high and recommended management inputs.

We used a White Air Seeder to plant a treated (insecticide/fungicide seed treatment) GMO variety, P22T41R2 with the RR2Y and SCN traits, in the conventional cropping system under recommended inputs at 150,000 seeds/acre in 15 inch row spacing. We also planted a non-treated, non-GMO variety, 92Y21, in the organic cropping system under recommended inputs at 150,000 seeds/acre but in 30-inch row spacing. We used the typical 15” row spacing in the conventional cropping system, but the typical 30” row spacing (for cultivation of weeds) in the organic cropping system. In addition, P22T41R2 is not an isoline of P92Y21 so only the maturity of the two varieties and not the genetics are similar between the two cropping systems. We also planted both varieties in their respective cropping systems at 200,000 seeds/acre in the high input management treatment, and also included the organic seed treatment, Sabrex, in the seed hopper when planting 92Y21 in the organic cropping system in the high input treatment.

Darrel Good: Waiting for Higher Corn and Soybean Prices

Darrel Good: Waiting for Higher Corn and Soybean Prices: By many accounts, corn and soybean producers still have not priced a relatively large portion of the 2015 crops. These crops are being held in open storage, either on the farm or in commercial facilities, or in the form of basis contracts or delayed pricing contracts. Producers have judged that there is potential for higher prices, or at least a small risk of lower prices, as the marketing year progresses.

The strategy of waiting on higher prices after harvest was generally successful last year, but required some timely pricing. Using central Illinois as an example, the average cash price of corn at interior elevators was $3.09 in October 2014 and $3.74 in December 2014. Daily prices ranged from $2.80 in October to $3.90 in December. Prices generally moved lower during the winter and early spring of 2015, but recovered to an average of $3.85 in July 2015. The extreme daily high in July was $4.15, but the price declined below $3.50 by the end of the month. For soybeans, the average cash price was $9.40 in October 2014 and $10.23 in December 2014. Daily prices ranged from $8.82 in October to $10.41 in December. Like corn prices, soybean prices were lower in the winter and early spring of 2015, but recovered to an average of $10.10 in July, with a daily high of $10.36.

Wake Up Call Allendale Advisory Center

Wake Up Call Allendale Advisory Center: Grain markets are in a narrow range overnight with spreading providing the most volume. Outside markets are quiet waiting for employment reports today.

The corn and soybean futures are in a tug-o-war as end-user would like to buy some inventory going into the end of year and producers are not willing to let go of grain at these prices. Trading volume is low as spreaders and funds roll positions out of December into deferred contracts

I-80 Harvest Tour: Illinois Farmers Wrap Up Harvest, Thanks to Dry Fall Weather | Agweb.com

I-80 Harvest Tour: Illinois Farmers Wrap Up Harvest, Thanks to Dry Fall Weather | Agweb.com: Harvest is wrapping up around the Corn Belt and for most states, that's much earlier than normal.�

Most fields are now bare in Illinois. But if�you look closely, some farmers are still finishing up.

“I just started a little later so I’m getting done a little later,” said Matt Burgener, who farms in Moweaqua, Ill.

Burgener is rolling on the last of his acres. He said this harvest went by fast because it’s been one of the driest on record.