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Thursday, November 05, 2015

Homegrown shirts? South Carolina cotton farmer solves a problem | Cotton content from Southeast Farm Press

Homegrown shirts? South Carolina cotton farmer solves a problem | Cotton content from Southeast Farm Press: As a cotton farmer, Atwood "At" McIntosh had a concern: It was next to impossible to find cotton clothes he knew to be definitively U.S. grown and made. He's set out to fix that problem.

In 2014, McIntosh’s idea to make polo shirts from the cotton he grows on his farm in Williamsburg County, SC, became a reality when he launched his cotton shirt business Homegrown Cotton. He wanted to make sure the entire process was as local as possible, from the time his cotton left the gin to the finished product.

In 2012, McIntosh toured Cotton Incorporated’s research center in Cary, N.C. and became interested in what happens to his cotton when it leaves the gin. This sparked the interest in trying to develop a finished product with his cotton.

Weather Risks Could Push Corn Back to $7 - Corn - News | Agweb.com

Weather Risks Could Push Corn Back to $7 - Corn - News | Agweb.com: “Unfortunately, weather-wise it only gets much worse in 2016,” says Bill Kirk, CEO and co-founder of Weather Trends International, a unique weather forecasting group that makes predictions a year in advance after analyzing more than 125 years of weather history and 24 separate climate cycles before making literally quintillions of calculations each day.

WTI is releasing a series of videos called “Seeds of Success,” and the first one makes a bold prediction – a return to $7 corn.

“Your risks include later planting in 2016, with a cooler and wetter weather likely to set up after a very warm, below-average snowfall winter across the Corn Belt as El Ni�o collapses,” Kirk says.

Rise of the smart farm: get ready for satellite-controlled cows | Guardian Sustainable Business | The Guardian

Rise of the smart farm: get ready for satellite-controlled cows | Guardian Sustainable Business | The Guardian: The first successful weather satellite, TIROS-1, was launched in 1960. The images, though a bit blurry, picked up a typhoon 1,000 miles east of Australia. This satellite only lasted 78 days in orbit but it showed the benefits of space observations, ushering in an era of much more accurate weather information that has helped save lives and protect livelihoods.

Today there are more than 200 non-military operational satellites looking at the Earth and agriculture is a key beneficiary of the boom in this technology. As innovation drives down the cost of getting a satellite into orbit, and more data becomes available, increasing numbers of farmers are set to benefit.

From the Ground Up - Weather Still the Biggest Gamble for Agriculture

From the Ground Up - Weather Still the Biggest Gamble for Agriculture: We certainly have experienced an odd weather year in 2015, and while meteorologists are continuing to workon their fortune telling skills, the weather remains the biggest gamble for agricultural producers. John Nielsen- Gammon is a professor of Meteorology and the Texas State Climatologist.

“2015 was a bit of a roller coaster ride. We’ve set several records. May was the wettest month on record for the state as a whole. The average rainfall across the state was over nine inches, shattered the previous record, and that pretty much ended the drought that started back in 2010. The lingering reservoir levels being low, floods will fill them up pretty fast.”

Eye on Agriculture: ND Sunflower Production - KXNet.com - Bismarck/Minot/Williston/Dickinson-KXNEWS,ND

Eye on Agriculture: ND Sunflower Production - KXNet.com - Bismarck/Minot/Williston/Dickinson-KXNEWS,ND: Elevator operators report that just over half of the sunflower crop has come off the fields.
In this week's Eye on Agriculture, Melinda Bolton takes a look at how the crop's popularity has changed in recent years.
During peak years Don Fornshell says there would be about a hundred trucks lined up at CHS's West Lot in Minot, all planning to fill the elevator with freshly harvested sunflower seeds.�
(Don Fornshell, West Plant Manager, CHS) "Most years you're backed up to the dryers because there's a lot of wet stuff coming in."
But not this year, and not for the last couple of years, as Fornshell says sunflower planting has declined in North Dakota.�

Top sales: Nerdist host Chris Hardwick buys a storied estate in Los Feliz - LA Times

Top sales: Nerdist host Chris Hardwick buys a storied estate in Los Feliz - LA Times: Television host and comedian Chris Hardwick and media heiress�Lydia Hearst, who are engaged to be married next summer, paid $11 million for an Italianate-style home designed by noted architect Paul Williams.

Guam’s Rising Luxury Real-Estate Market - WSJ

Guam’s Rising Luxury Real-Estate Market - WSJ: Here’s some intelligence for Americans who think of Guam only as a military outpost. The U.S. territory in the Western Pacific offers white-sand beaches and ocean vistas—at far lower prices than its closest American neighbor, Hawaii.

Are We Headed Toward Another Housing Crisis? What Hasn’t Changed Enough.

Are We Headed Toward Another Housing Crisis? What Hasn’t Changed Enough.: Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the two government-backed housing corporations bailed out seven years ago by federal taxpayers, may be headed for trouble again.

Despite post-financial crisis pressure to reform, neither Fannie nor Freddie has done much to mitigate the risk to the American taxpayer inherent in government backing for these institutions.

In fact, it appears that their equity (capital) cushion is dwindling even as portfolio obligations guaranteed by the federal taxpayer have increased in size totaling nearly $5 trillion.

US housing recovery divided on age, race and place - Yahoo Finance

US housing recovery divided on age, race and place - Yahoo Finance: It's the most profitable time to sell a house since the Great Recession started in late 2007. But first-time buyers are increasingly scarce.

More Americans are qualifying for mortgages, yet minorities still get disproportionately rejected.

Three new industry analyses released Thursday show that the recovering economy has produced a divided U.S. housing market. Where people live, their age and the color of their skin have largely influenced who has benefited as real estate continues to heal from the bursting of a mortgage bubble that triggered the worst economic downturn in nearly 80 years.

Gmail - Corn Lower at 6:00 a.m. CST

Gmail - Corn Lower at 6:00 a.m. CST: Today's Market View
Corn Lower at 6:00 a.m. CST
23 minutes ago
Corn: The market remains in a sideways trend.

Soybeans: The long-term commercial outlook remains bullish.

Wheat: Continued strong commercial buying continues to support the Chicago market.

Cotton: The trend of the market remains sideways.

Live cattle: The short-term trend looks to have turned down.

Has 'Commodities' Slump Undercut Emerging Nations?

Has 'Commodities' Slump Undercut Emerging Nations?: While the 60% oil price crash from September 2014 to current levels has largely impacted the major producers (Russia, U.S., Saudi Arabia), a much wider range of commodity price depression is raising havoc with previously fast-growing emerging economies (Brazil, South Africa, Australia, Indonesia, etc.).

The latter, whose economic dynamics were heavily predicated on a large proportion of commodity reserves are now undergoing a serious deflation in economic growth, voiding any chance of expansion, while this deep commodity price depression persists.

Commodities Slump: How Long Will It Last? - Bloomberg Business

Commodities Slump: How Long Will It Last? - Bloomberg Business: Daniel Yergin, vice chairman at IHS, discusses the commodity slump, oil prices and the prospects for the global economy. He speaks to Bloomberg's Haslinda Amin on "Countdown" from the Barclays Asia Forum in Singapore. (Source: Bloomberg)

Profitability vs. Feasibility And The Paradox Of Purchasing Farmland | Farms.com

Profitability vs. Feasibility And The Paradox Of Purchasing Farmland | Farms.com: A student came to my office not too long ago excited about the opportunity to purchase 80 acres of farmland close to his family’s farm. His father offered to let him use the family machinery and equipment in exchange for labor. The student had properly worked his cost-and-return estimates for field corn and was excited that the undertaking looked like a profitable venture. So we took a look at the annual principal and interest payments that would be due over a 20-year and 30-year loan life given the price of the land and his available 25% down payment. Sadly, the deal did not even come close to cash flowing at the $4.25 per bushel corn price he had assumed. Corn prices would need to reach nearly $8.00 per bushel for the deal to cash flow, even with the machinery-for-labor trade.

2015 Harvest Prices And Estimated 2016 Projected Prices | Farms.com

2015 Harvest Prices And Estimated 2016 Projected Prices | Farms.com: For most Midwest states, harvest prices used to determine crop insurance payments are $3.83 per bushel for corn and $8.91 per bushel for soybeans. Yields will need to be below guarantee yields before payments occur. Current futures prices suggest that 2016 projected prices will be lower than 2015 projected prices, leading to lower revenue guarantees in 2016.